LGBT+ Hate Crime

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Conference
2019 National LGBT+ Conference
Date
25 July 2019
Decision
Carried

Conference is concerned about the rise in hate crime against the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender plus (LGBT+) community over recent years. Although there is no direct evidence as to the root cause of this, Brexit and a reduction in police staff numbers due to austerity are considered to be contributing to empowering a shift in public views against the LGBT+ community.

We know that despite a rise in incident reporting, many hate crimes are still not reported and there has been a significant increase in these crimes.

Stonewalls 2017 National LGBT Survey presented key findings such as:

“One in five LGBT people (21 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the last 12 months.”

“Two in five trans people (41 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last 12 months and one in six LGB people, who aren’t trans (16 per cent), have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation in the same period.”

“The number of lesbian, gay and bisexual people who have experienced a hate crime or incident in the last year because of their sexual orientation has risen by 78 per cent from 9 per cent in 2013 to 16 per cent in 2017.”

“Four in five LGBT people (81 per cent) who experienced a hate crime or incident didn’t report it to the police.”

We are also aware that the number of police officers in England and Wales has fallen by over 20,000 between March 2010 and March 2018.

There has been a 16% reduction in policing front line workers since March 2010 to March 2018.

Therefore, in order to try and combat hate crime against the LGBT+ community conference calls for National LGBT+ Committee to:

1)Work on campaign material aimed at combatting LGBT+ hate crime within the workplace.

2) Liaise with UNISON LGBT+ members in the Police and Justice Service Group to promote training on LGBT+ issues within their branches.

3) To further promote working closely with LGBT+ organisations such as Stonewall and their diversity champion’s programme, in order to promote a safe and inclusive environment within the workplace

4) To encourage regions to work collaboratively with their local Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC)