PENSIONERS AND PROSTATE CANCER

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Conference
2014 National Retired Members Conference
Date
3 June 2014
Decision

At a previous National Retired Members Conference, the delegates noted a resolution high-lighting the fact that prostate cancer in men is a real matter of concern as the prostate cancer has overtaken lung cancer as the single most common cancer in all men in the UK and accounts for 24% of all new cancer diagnosis. Research has shown that 1 in every 8 and 1 in 4 black men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their lives and that certain ethnic minority groups are more prone to it.

100 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every day. That is 1 every 15 minutes

Conference further notes that prostate cancer mainly affects men over the age of 50 and the risk increases with age. The average age for men to be diagnosed with prostate cancer is in their retirement years between 70 and 74 years.

There is a lot of myth and mis-information about the subject of prostate cancer and all pensioners will benefit from education about the symptoms and treatment available and that early diagnosis is important for successful treatment.

Men including the pensioners are reluctant to visit the doctor and many find it difficult to discuss or talk about prostate cancer.

Conference calls upon National Retired Members’ Committee to work with National Executive Council and other relevant organisations to:

1. continue to campaign vigorously for greater understanding and factual awareness of prostate cancer, its treatment and the benefits of earliest screening for pensioners;

2. disseminate and publicise the research and other information about prostate cancer in UNISON publications and to local branches.